Displaying items by tag: Board And Care Home

There Are Many Kinds Of Senior Living To Consider For Your Loved One


You have probably heard the words Assisted Living. Perhaps you wondered “what is it”? “Are there different types?” The answer is that there is no commonly accepted definition of Assisted Living, and there are many types of Senior Living outside a seniors own home. The fact is most if not every state in the U.S. has its own definitions, descriptions and usually licensing requirements for senior living options. Assisted Living is generally like apartment living with the aid of services provided by staff if needed. Things like meals, personal care, cleaning and transportation may all be a part of what is offered by a business offering Assisted Living to seniors. Also there are Adult Foster Care Homes, Board and Care Homes, Residential Care Homes and Nursing Homes offering similar services to name just a few.

 

 

 

Signs That It May be Time for Your Loved One to Consider Senior Living Options

Deciding on whether it is the right time to move a loved one into assisted living or a senior care home can be one of the hardest and most heart-wrenching decisions you and your family may have to make. When we were deciding if it was time to move mom, it took us several weeks, maybe even a month to finally make the decision. But if the intent is to keep your senior parent happy, safe and healthy, then it is probably a decision you must undertake, because in truth it is the best for your loved one and for the family as a whole to know they are safe and well cared for.

At Senior Home Search, we have read hundreds of articles with titles stating 3 reasons, 5 reasons, 8 reasons, 11 reasons and more why it is time for your senior parent to move. However there is no form to fill out that says Yes/No it is time for Mom to move into a Senior Care Home. There are not 3, 4 or 11 checkboxes that will decide for you.

How Do We Decide it is Time For A Move Into a Senior Home?

Each person’s individual situation and circumstances alone will determine if a move to Assisted Living or to a Senior Care Home should be considered. Sometimes there may be only a few things to consider, sometimes many. So, what can help us to evaluate our loved ones circumstances? You will need answers to important questions to help you decide about senior home living.

Health And Memory Questions:

  • Is your parent telling you that he is eating, but you're seeing food go bad in the refrigerator?
  • If your loved one isn’t maintaining a healthy weight, it could be because they’re having a hard time cooking their meals or they have a loss of appetite symptomatic of some larger problem. Either way, if they need assistance with as basic a task as eating often enough, they should have regular care.
  • Are there signs that your parent is not changing their clothes on a regular basis? Do they seem to always have the same thing on when you visit? Are there very few clothes in the laundry basket? What about their appearance, does it appear they have not been bathing and grooming themselves as before?
  • Is your aging parent remembering to take medications correctly, with the right dosages and at the right time? Are medications expired? Take a look at the last refill date on prescriptions, are there more pills in the bottle than there should be given the last refill, this should be a big red flag.
  • Are there stacks of papers and unpaid bills lying around? This may be a sign that they are not remembering to care for daily and monthly tasks and need assistance to keep up.

 

Safety Questions:

Are you noticing injuries? Minor injuries become a much bigger deal the older you get and if your loved one is suffering from them, then they likely need more day-to-day help than they’re willing to admit.

  • Are they able to operate appliances safely? Do they remember to turn appliances off when they are finished cooking?
  • Is the home your parent is currently living in equipped with safety features such as grab bars and perhaps an emergency response system with fall detection?
  • Do they have a plan in place to contact help in case of an emergency?
  • Seeming more frail. Do you feel anything "different" about the person's strength and stature when you hug? Can your loved one rise easily from a chair? Does she or he seem unsteady or unable to balance? Compare these observations to the last time you were together.
  • Do you notice any bruising on their arms, legs or other parts of the body that would indicate they may be falling? Many times seniors will try and hide this from you.
  • What about an emergency such as a fire, flood or other natural disaster? Would your loved one know how to be safe in those situations, if not they should not be alone.
  • When you really look at your parent, do you see the bright and vibrant person from years ago, or do you see a more limited person who needs help one or more hours a day, or even around the clock?

Family Situation Questions:

  • Do they have friends, or are they isolated from others most of the time?
  • Is there someone who checks in on them on a regular basis? If not you or another family member, who does this? Is your loved one willing to consider a home safety system or a personal alarm system, or even a daily calling service?
  • Are you able to change your schedule to spend more time helping your loved one? If not then it may be time to consider senior housing options

These are just a few things to help you begin to consider whether or not it is time for a change. Change is never easy and especially for seniors. So in the next article we will consider ways to approach the subject with your loved one.

 


 

 

 

Living As A Senior in Michigan

The State of Michigan is blessed with the riches of unspoiled nature: the nation's longest freshwater coastline, world class beaches and the abundance of fresh produce straight from the farm. Here you will find more than 100 public beaches, sand dunes, two National Lakeshores and the only national marine sanctuary in the Great Lakes - the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary in Lake Huron. Along the shoreline there are 129 lighthouses, numerous maritime museums, ten shipwreck-diving preserves and historic military fortifications.

And Michigan is a state of industry. From the ‘Big Three’ auto plants to lumber, pharmaceutical and mining industries. These have contributed to comfortable retirement for Michigan seniors. There is the world famous Henry Ford Museum, America's "Greatest History Attraction" and a thriving arts and culinary scene. And don’t forget the Mighty Mackinaw Bridge and Mackinaw Island where folks can visit life as it was in bygone eras.

Michigan has 19 million acres of forests. Lakes, campgrounds, wildlife refuges and 103 Michigan state parks and recreation areas create a wide variety of recreational pursuits.

Assisted Living in Michigan

The state of Michigan does not license or regulate assisted living facilities.

In Michigan, assisted living community staff will create a service plan, or care plan, for each resident. This is done as part of an initial screening of each resident and before the person moves into the facility. These plans are based on information provided by the resident or his or her legal representative.

As part of the plan, the resident's primary care doctor conducts a physical and mental health screening to make sure assisted living is the appropriate level of care for their needs. If signs of Alzheimer's or dementia are found, then memory care may be recommended. Most Michigan assisted living facilities to not accept residents needing this level of care. If a physical ailment is present that requires regular therapy or medication, skilled nursing or rehabilitation care are usually the right choices. For seniors who are  capable of taking care of themselves, Michigan assisted living may be a good choice.

Licensed and Regulated Senior Homes in Michigan

Michigan does have a number of types of senior living that is Licensed, Regulated and Regularly Inspected by the State. These include:

  • Adult Foster Care Family Homes
  • Adult Foster Care Large Group Homes
  • Adult Foster Care Medium Group Homes
  • Adult Foster Care Small Group Homes
  • Homes for the Aged
  • Nursing Homes

Responsible for licensing such homes is the Michigan State Adult Foster Care and Homes for the Aged Licensing Division. There are Staffing Requirements and Staff Training Requirements to obtain and maintain a license. Also background checks for each staff member.

High-functioning seniors who may need help with bathing, dressing, meal preparation and other activities of daily living (ADLs) most often find themselves living in privately overseen residential care communities.

The Cost of Senior Living in Michigan

There are over 4,000 senior care homes of all types in Michigan. Genworth lists the average cost of a private, one bedroom unit in an assisted living community in Michigan as $4,084. This places Michigan on the higher end of the scale at about $100 over the national average, and about $200 lower than the median cost of assisted living in nearby states.

The state Medicaid program is known as Healthy Michigan, and can provide residents of the state with financial assistance. Qualifications to enroll include:

  • Permanent residents of the state of Michigan
  • Between 18 and 64 years old
  • Not pregnant at the time of application
  • Not currently enrolled in other Medicaid programs
  • Not eligible for Medicare

Also Michigan has several government agencies and various nonprofits that assist aging citizens who need help with their transition into assisted living, as well as for those who could use a helping hand before or after they have gotten settled in. These services are typically provide free of charge.

A Wide Variety of Michigan Senior Living Options

Yes Michigan many senior living possibilities, both licensed and unlicensed. From what some refer to as assisted living to state regulated homes such as Adult Foster Care, Group Homes and more providing home like settings with trained staff and the companionship of other seniors.

 Michigan icon 2

 

The Cost Of Nursing Homes and At-Home Care Goes Up Nationwide

A survey released by Genworth Financial Inc., showed that the cost for senior care continues to rise across the country. Costs were up an average of 3 percent from 2017 to 2018, with some care categories exceeding the United States inflation rate by two to three times.

The company Genworth, which released the survey, sells long-term insurance and has been publishing its care related survey for 15 years. According to Gordon Saunders the senior brand marketing manager for Genworth ““It is a benchmark to understand, as I age or as a family member ages, wha I can expect the cost is going to be.”

The availability of the type of workers to work in these settings is making it challenging - Gordon Saunders, Genworth Financial Inc.

One example of the pressure on the affordability of  senior care was in Virginia, where costs rose from 2017 to 2018 for homemaker services, home health aides, adult day care and nursing home care. The largest increase was for a private room in a nursing home facility, which rose nearly 7.7 percent in Virginia to a median annual cost of $102,200.

Nationally, costs for a private room in a nursing home rose 3 percent to $100,375.

Other Cost Increases For Long-Term Senior Care

  • The cost of Assisted Living Facilities rose by almost 6.7 percent from 20117 to 2018, to a median cost of $48,000 per year.
  • The costs for home health aides saw an increase of 2.3 percent to $50,336 annually nationwide.
  • The cost of adult day care services rose 2.8 percent nationally to $18,720 per year on average.

According to Gordon Saunders, one of the many reasons for the increase in the cost of long-term senior care is the ability of businesses to obtain qualified staff. “The availability of the type of workers to work in these settings is making it challenging,” he said.

And as the demand for senior care services continues to increase in the U.S. and worldwide for that matter, it can be expected that the cost of such services will continue to increase as well.

Genworth reports that its data was obtained from surveying about 49,000 long-term care providers nationwide.

wide variety of senior care options med

 

How Can We Afford Long-Term Senior Care?

One well reviewed and highly respected option for long-term senior care is becoming more and more available. That type of care is know, as Adult Foster Care, Senior Board and Care and other names depending upon what state you may reside in. With thousands of such homes now available throughout the U.S., many families are taking advantage of this type of senior long term care facility. Most states have licensing and staffing requirements, and these homes are an excellent alternative to nursing homes, often able to provide compatible care in a small homelike environment, and ad a much more affordable cost.

Please use our site to find such home near you and your family. And use our Help Sections to ask questions and get assistance. You will be glad you did.

 

Senior Homes - What are the Options in Your State

Types of Senior Living

In your search for a place for yourself or a place for mom or dad to live, you are seeing so many different names and terms for various types of senior homes and senior living. These terms and names have changed over the years and what we may have at one time called a 'Nursing Home' or 'Old Folks Home' are now called many other things. At one time thoughts of white-walled, institutional settings we we’re hesitant to visit are now independent and assisted living options offering a wide range of appealing amenities, features and socializations.

Assisted Living, Adult Foster Care, Nursing Home, Board and Care Homes.

The different levels of care available today will depend on you or your loved one's needs, and various options, depending on a senior's health, age and financial status.

What is very important however, is that most if not every state in the U.S. has it's own definitionsdescriptions and usually licensing requirements for senior living options. This is where we provide you with an important and useful resource for finding what your states options are.

To discover what senior living options are offered in your state:

 

  Click to Choose Your State

 

Information updated regularly.

What You Should Do When Searching For Senior Living

 

house logo flyer 4 

 When it comes time to choose a home for you or your senior Loved One, you may discover it is a difficult task. Your goal is to find the best home possible yet you may be looking at many, even dozens of homes on a list. How will you make the right decision?

The best way can be to make sure you are informed about each home you are considering. First it is great to have access to the internet so you may gather details about homes in your area, their basic information, rates, amenities, history, even photos of the homes and their surroundings. Also you will want to make a list so that you can collect that information about each home you are looking at and have it available when finally making that important choice. You can fill out the list from the facts you gather on the web, but also take it along when you visit the homes in your search. Obviously it is very important to visit each home you are considering.

So here are some tips on conducting your search and suggestions for some of the information you will want to collect.

 

1. Determine The Needs Of You Or Your Loved One

What are the needs which must be provided by the home? This is a question that should be answered first. If a home does not meet those needs it will not be placed on a list of homes you will consider. Needs may depend on your loved ones level of independence, health care needs, even budget and payment option requirements. Many of these questions are answered on websites such as Senior Home Search. But do not neglect calling the homes as well.

To determine needs you may ask some questions: Does your loved one require help with Activities of Daily Living - ADLs? Do they need help with dressing themselves, taking a shower, and going to the bathroom, preparing meals, taking their medications, etc.? Are there memory issues – dementia or Alzheimers disease? Some homes will not accept someone with memory issues while others specialize in and/or are licensed for memory care.  

 

2. Make a List of Homes

Once you have determined what needs must be provided by a prospective home, make a list of all of the homes that address those needs and are in a location that will be as convenient as possible to as many of those as will be regular visitors or responsible for monitoring your loved ones care. This will no doubt include family and also friends who are active in their care.

How many homes will be on this list depends on you, as you will be doing quite a bit of homework in order to find the best possible fit. Many people will work with a list of at least 3 or 4 homes that fill their needs. As discussed these needs will include 1) Location 2) Budget and 3) Required Care.

 

3. Visit Each Home / Facility on Your List

Most if not all of us would never consider buying a home or renting an apartment without first visiting. Likewise, each home on your list should be visited, allowing sufficient time to get a thorough understanding of the home, its staff and how it is operated. In many cases, especially with smaller homes, you will be meeting with the owner. Be sure to have your checklist and questions handy on your visits.

 

4. Ask the Right Questions

Whether during your visit or on the phone, you should be prepared with the right questions to ask about the home. This is important to ensure your search for the best possible home and environment for your loved one is a success. Your questions should be designed to help you understand clearly the services, programs and processes the care home has in place. Your questions may include:

 

  • What is the ratio of caregivers to residents on every shift?

  • Does the staff undergo a background check before employment?

  • How will you meet my loved ones needs?

  • How often are visitors allowed? Are visitors allowed anytime?

  • Is the staff provided with ongoing training? Is the staff monitored to assure proper behavior and job performance?

  • What are the state requirements and the homes requirements to be hired to provide care?

  • What safety guidelines are in place at the home?

 

These are just a few examples of questions that should be answered clearly and in a detailed manor by the home/facility operator. You will no doubt want to add others you feel are important. And do not be afraid to write down the answers provided while on your visit.

 

5. Be Thorough When Visiting Each Home

When you visit each care home, make sure you inspect the facility thoroughly noting things that are good about it, and also any red flags which may turn up. Does the home or facility make you feel welcomed? Does it smell good like it was just cleaned or does it smell like urine? 

Do you see licensing certificates posted in plain view? Do they have photos of the residents’ celebrations? Do they visibly display their food menu or schedule of activities? Are the residents just sleeping in their room during the day or are they staying active? Are the bathrooms and inside the refrigerators clean? Does it look like they pay attention to detail at the facility?

You can see that a very thorough inspection will take some time, but is extremely important. Your loved one may be living there one day!

 

6. Talk to the Residents

Are the residents living in the home sociable? How do they interact with one another? Do they look well groomed? Are they happy? Are their alert levels similar to that of your Loved One? In case the residents are not alert, it does not mean the care facility is a bad home. It could mean that the particular home or community specializes in dementia residents. Make sure to find out from the staff and owner the condition of the residents before you visit to help save you time. And it is important to talk to the residents and try to determine if they would get along with your Loved One.

 

7. Talk to the Owner and the Caregivers

Does the Owner and each Caregiver at the home during your visit seem friendly and welcoming? Do they rush you off or do they take time to answer your questions. Do they seem to want to understand your Loved One’s needs? How do the staff and caregivers interact with the residents? Do they seem like they care? Observe them and do not hesitate to take notes.

 

8. Get All the Facts

Preferably before your visit, you should check on the Facility’s Licensing Records and get testimonials from the other residents’ families that are staying there now or that have stayed there in the past. Check with the neighbors to see if there have been any reported problems inside or outside of the home or facility. 

If you want a thorough report, a great place to start checking on the care facility is with State Licensing board or department. Each care home and community is licensed by the State and they keep on file all of the write-ups or citations each facility has received since it opened. 

Minor citations are common such as administration write-ups. However, major citations noted by the State inspector are something worth learning more about in detail. If a care facility has a major citation, it is worth getting more information from the State and even bringing it to the attention of the care homeowner or management staff for an explanation. It may turn out to be a reason to remove that home from your list. 

You may also check to see if the home is rated online at sites other than the States website. Do your research and check online reviews and ratings for the facilities you are considering. Be sure to also check the Better Business Bureau rating and look for complaints and even compliments from the residents or their families.

 

9. Take All The Time You Need!the latest small

The more time you have to research each home on your list, the better it is for you and your Loved One. The home you and your family choose should be the best you can find. This is a most important decision and deserves as much time as needed.

Keep in mind that good, excelling care homes and communities will many times stay full with no vacancies. When a vacancy does become available, due to their popularity and reputation, they fill their opening up very quickly.

It can be difficult lining up a good care home just when it has an opening And it is the time when your Loved One is in need of care. If you already visited homes but your Loved One is not ready, it might be a good idea to see if you can go on the care facilities wait lists. 

Summary and Conclusion:

Selecting the right senior care home for you or your Loved One is a very important task. A good – well thought out choice is important in order to avoid having to move your Loved One from one care facility to another due to unforeseen problems or issues. Such moves can be very difficult for your Loved One and place them under a lot of stress. 

The initial move to an assisted living care home or community is already going to be a big adjustment so you want to make sure that you choose carefully. You can use these tips to help increase your chances of success in finding the right home.

Use Senior Home Search to find Adult Foster Care, Assisted Living, Board and Care Homes and More

 

The purpose of this website is to provide information that will assist you in understanding your senior housing choices so you may make informed housing decisions.

One of the most important decisions older adults make is their choice of housing. There are a vast array of available options ranging from living independently in your own home without receiving any in-home support services to living in a nursing home and receiving total care.

Many seniors will want to stay in a cherished home for as long as possible but will make some changes to make it safer and more comfortable. Others will seek a group setting, where companionship and planned activities fill the day and where support services may be easier to obtain.

Housing appropriate for one older adult may be completely unacceptable for another. An older person who needs assistance may require a different type of housing than one who can live independently. What’s most important is matching, as closely as possible, housing and living arrangements with an older adult’s needs and desires.

 

If you are beginning to think about senior living options our website can help you

It helps to know beforehand that the terms for housing options for older adults can be very confusing. In some cases, no standard “vocabulary” clearly distinguishes one housing type from another.

An example is the term “Assisted Living.” There is not a standard definition for this term. In some states, where assisted living is not licensed or regulated, the term may be used very loosely. Facilities in these states may not provide the services usually associated with assisted living. In other states, the term is used to describe a specific type of housing option. Those investigating various housing options should make sure they have confirmed all the features and services offered by a provider.

It is similar with the terms "Senior Home", "Adult Foster Care" or "Adult Foster Care Home", "Board and Care Home" and the list goes on. It is important to understand the terms used commonly in your state before your search begins. We can help.

At Senior Home Search, we offer a convenient and free service for finding homes for seniors that are of a Small Setting - usually 6 residents and up to 20 residents. Most of these wonderful homes are owned and operated by individual family business and are regulated and overseen by state agencies. In short, homes that are an excellent option for Senior Care.

 

shs house 4

 

 

Finding the right senior care home, or senior housing can get overwhelming at first, but having a better understanding of all the options of an Adult Foster Care home in your area, will make it easier and less stressful.

Senior Home Search will help.

 

shs header long tall small sm 2