Friday, 01 January 2021 22:43

Senior Living Options In Michigan

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Living As A Senior in Michigan

The State of Michigan is blessed with the riches of unspoiled nature: the nation's longest freshwater coastline, world class beaches and the abundance of fresh produce straight from the farm. Here you will find more than 100 public beaches, sand dunes, two National Lakeshores and the only national marine sanctuary in the Great Lakes - the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary in Lake Huron. Along the shoreline there are 129 lighthouses, numerous maritime museums, ten shipwreck-diving preserves and historic military fortifications.

And Michigan is a state of industry. From the ‘Big Three’ auto plants to lumber, pharmaceutical and mining industries. These have contributed to comfortable retirement for Michigan seniors. There is the world famous Henry Ford Museum, America's "Greatest History Attraction" and a thriving arts and culinary scene. And don’t forget the Mighty Mackinaw Bridge and Mackinaw Island where folks can visit life as it was in bygone eras.

Michigan has 19 million acres of forests. Lakes, campgrounds, wildlife refuges and 103 Michigan state parks and recreation areas create a wide variety of recreational pursuits.

Assisted Living in Michigan

The state of Michigan does not license or regulate assisted living facilities.

In Michigan, assisted living community staff will create a service plan, or care plan, for each resident. This is done as part of an initial screening of each resident and before the person moves into the facility. These plans are based on information provided by the resident or his or her legal representative.

As part of the plan, the resident's primary care doctor conducts a physical and mental health screening to make sure assisted living is the appropriate level of care for their needs. If signs of Alzheimer's or dementia are found, then memory care may be recommended. Most Michigan assisted living facilities to not accept residents needing this level of care. If a physical ailment is present that requires regular therapy or medication, skilled nursing or rehabilitation care are usually the right choices. For seniors who are  capable of taking care of themselves, Michigan assisted living may be a good choice.

Licensed and Regulated Senior Homes in Michigan

Michigan does have a number of types of senior living that is Licensed, Regulated and Regularly Inspected by the State. These include:

  • Adult Foster Care Family Homes
  • Adult Foster Care Large Group Homes
  • Adult Foster Care Medium Group Homes
  • Adult Foster Care Small Group Homes
  • Homes for the Aged
  • Nursing Homes

Responsible for licensing such homes is the Michigan State Adult Foster Care and Homes for the Aged Licensing Division. There are Staffing Requirements and Staff Training Requirements to obtain and maintain a license. Also background checks for each staff member.

High-functioning seniors who may need help with bathing, dressing, meal preparation and other activities of daily living (ADLs) most often find themselves living in privately overseen residential care communities.

The Cost of Senior Living in Michigan

There are over 4,000 senior care homes of all types in Michigan. Genworth lists the average cost of a private, one bedroom unit in an assisted living community in Michigan as $4,084. This places Michigan on the higher end of the scale at about $100 over the national average, and about $200 lower than the median cost of assisted living in nearby states.

The state Medicaid program is known as Healthy Michigan, and can provide residents of the state with financial assistance. Qualifications to enroll include:

  • Permanent residents of the state of Michigan
  • Between 18 and 64 years old
  • Not pregnant at the time of application
  • Not currently enrolled in other Medicaid programs
  • Not eligible for Medicare

Also Michigan has several government agencies and various nonprofits that assist aging citizens who need help with their transition into assisted living, as well as for those who could use a helping hand before or after they have gotten settled in. These services are typically provide free of charge.

A Wide Variety of Michigan Senior Living Options

Yes Michigan many senior living possibilities, both licensed and unlicensed. From what some refer to as assisted living to state regulated homes such as Adult Foster Care, Group Homes and more providing home like settings with trained staff and the companionship of other seniors.

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Last modified on Friday, 01 January 2021 23:27

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    Governor Cuomo Has Defended The State's Reporting Of Nursing Home Deaths

    Amid allegations that New York coronavirus deaths in nursing homes were under reported, Governor Andrew Cuomo says they were only “delayed”.
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    How bad was the under-reporting? The New York Governor said Monday that everything reported was accurate though delayed. However the state attorney general last month said the death toll was much higher, possibly 50% higher.

     

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    Why The Delay In Reporting Nursing Home Deaths From Covid-19?


    Governor Cuomo said Monday that the state had released the numbers it had immediate access to at the time. That delay was in part due to the state's dealing with a federal inquiry by the Department of Justice, Cuomo said. Health officials decided to focus on that data request before responding to state lawmakers' request for more information. The governor said, "We paused the state legislature's request while we were finishing the DOJ request".
    A top aide to Cuomo, Melissa DeRosa, said to state lawmakers that "we froze" when asked for the true number of nursing home deaths, worrying they would be "used against us" by a hostile White House administration, the. The governor's office later confirmed that report.


    "Everyone was busy…We're in the midst of managing a pandemic. There was a delay in providing the press and the public all that additional information." - Governor Andrew Cuomo


    Other Nursing Home Reporting Issues Dogging Cuomo


    Cuomo has also faced criticism in recent days after an Associated Press report found that, in the early days of the pandemic, New York sent more than 9,000 recovering coronavirus patients from hospitals back into nursing homes.


    A report by the New York DOH (New York State Department of Health) seemed to defend the Governor claiming the readmissions did not contribute to the spread of coronavirus in nursing homes. "These patients could not have been responsible for introducing COVID into their nursing home, as they had COVID prior to going to the hospital for treatment and before being readmitted," the report said. Also in the report, a claim that "most patients" readmitted to nursing homes were likely no longer infectious at that point.

     

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    https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/department-justice-requesting-data-governors-states-issued-covid-19-orders-may-have-resulted

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    https://nypost.com/2021/02/11/cuomo-aide-admits-they-hid-nursing-home-data-from-feds/

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    https://apnews.com/article/new-york-andrew-cuomo-us-news-coronavirus-pandemic-nursing-homes-512cae0abb55a55f375b3192f2cdd6b5

    New York State Department of Health
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  • Is It Time For A Move To Assisted Living Or Senior Home Living? Is It Time For A Move To Assisted Living Or Senior Home Living?

    There Are Many Kinds Of Senior Living To Consider For Your Loved One


    You have probably heard the words Assisted Living. Perhaps you wondered “what is it”? “Are there different types?” The answer is that there is no commonly accepted definition of Assisted Living, and there are many types of Senior Living outside a seniors own home. The fact is most if not every state in the U.S. has its own definitions, descriptions and usually licensing requirements for senior living options. Assisted Living is generally like apartment living with the aid of services provided by staff if needed. Things like meals, personal care, cleaning and transportation may all be a part of what is offered by a business offering Assisted Living to seniors. Also there are Adult Foster Care Homes, Board and Care Homes, Residential Care Homes and Nursing Homes offering similar services to name just a few.

     

     

     

    Signs That It May be Time for Your Loved One to Consider Senior Living Options

    Deciding on whether it is the right time to move a loved one into assisted living or a senior care home can be one of the hardest and most heart-wrenching decisions you and your family may have to make. When we were deciding if it was time to move mom, it took us several weeks, maybe even a month to finally make the decision. But if the intent is to keep your senior parent happy, safe and healthy, then it is probably a decision you must undertake, because in truth it is the best for your loved one and for the family as a whole to know they are safe and well cared for.

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    How Do We Decide it is Time For A Move Into a Senior Home?

    Each person’s individual situation and circumstances alone will determine if a move to Assisted Living or to a Senior Care Home should be considered. Sometimes there may be only a few things to consider, sometimes many. So, what can help us to evaluate our loved ones circumstances? You will need answers to important questions to help you decide about senior home living.

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    • Are there signs that your parent is not changing their clothes on a regular basis? Do they seem to always have the same thing on when you visit? Are there very few clothes in the laundry basket? What about their appearance, does it appear they have not been bathing and grooming themselves as before?
    • Is your aging parent remembering to take medications correctly, with the right dosages and at the right time? Are medications expired? Take a look at the last refill date on prescriptions, are there more pills in the bottle than there should be given the last refill, this should be a big red flag.
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    How Can We Afford Long-Term Senior Care?

    One well reviewed and highly respected option for long-term senior care is becoming more and more available. That type of care is know, as Adult Foster Care, Senior Board and Care and other names depending upon what state you may reside in. With thousands of such homes now available throughout the U.S., many families are taking advantage of this type of senior long term care facility. Most states have licensing and staffing requirements, and these homes are an excellent alternative to nursing homes, often able to provide compatible care in a small homelike environment, and ad a much more affordable cost.

    Please use our site to find such home near you and your family. And use our Help Sections to ask questions and get assistance. You will be glad you did.

     

  • More Caregivers Are Putting Off Their Own Health Care Needs More Caregivers Are Putting Off Their Own Health Care Needs

    A recent AP-NORC Poll shows an alarming trend among Americas caregivers and it’s not good.

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    By searching our website, or taking advantage of your states government licensing website, you can find Adult Foster Care homes near you that offer day care as well.

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